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The vibrator became available as consumer self-therapeutic home device in the 1900s, which, according to some historians, eliminated the need for doctors to administer treatment.5 This shift has been attributed to couple of reasons. Primarily, it was more cost effective for patients. Home vibrators were available for about $5 (which would be approximately $125 today), where the cost of treatment by physicians was between $2-3 per visit (approximately $50-75 today).5 Additionally, they were more accessible, could be used in private or with a spouse, and gave the user more control.6 Finally the increasing availability of home electricity in the beginning of the century contributed to the electromechanical vibrator’s popularity.6 The vibrator was the fifth home appliance to be electrified (preceded by the sewing machine, fan, teakettle, and toaster), preceding the vacuum and electric iron by about ten years!6 While this could be interpreted as greater social acceptability, some historians speculate it was a response to demand and necessity. Hand crank vibrators were popular in the early 1900’s for their lower cost and lack of need for a power source. The action is a plunging motion of the center disk at the end combined with a rotating eccentric weight. There were also applicators that would screw into the center disk. Click Image For A More Detailed View
MACAURA'S PULSOCON HAND VIBRATOR

Macaura’s Pulsocon Hand Vibrator

The action is a plunging motion of the center disk at the end combined with a rotating eccentric weight. There were also applicators that would screw into the center disk. Marked Pat. applied for, Serial No. 6681. Could be from as early as the early 1880’s or as late as about 1900.
Macaura's Blood Circulator

Macaura’s Blood Circulator

Originally sold as the Macaura’s Pulsocon and later renamed the Macaura’s Blood Circulator. The action is a plunging motion of the center disk at the end. There were also applicators that would screw into the center disk. British patent 13932, I am unsure of the year this patent was issued due to complexities in the British patent numbering system. Some evidence suggests as early as the mid 1880’s and other information suggests as late as the early 1900’s. This model was probably on the market until as late as 1920. Made by The British Appliances Manufacturing Company.
Gyro-Lator

VEEDEE Vibrator

The Veedee is an eccentric weight based vibrator. By loosening a nut the offset of the spinning weight can be adjusted thus controlling the magnitude of the vibration. This vibrator serial number 58199, c1906 came in a complete set with a plush lined case and a variety of applicators. Made by J.E. Garratt, 96 Southwark Street, London S.E.
Dr. Johansen's Auto Vibrator

Dr. Johansen’s Auto Vibrator

Pat’d March 5, 1907, Made by KNY-Sheerer Co. New York.  
The

The “Vibro-Life”

Serial number 9651, pat’d December 1st, 1908, Made by Eureka Vibrator Co., 1283 Broadway, New York.  
Vibrako Blood Circulator

Vibrako Blood Circulator

The Vibrako Blood Circulator is based on the design of the Macauras Blood Circulator and has been modified to make it quieter in operation. It was patented on April 28, 1914 by William Francis Lay. This example is marked patent pending so that would date it to 1913, shortly before the patent was issued.  
Woody

Woody

Here we have three variations of a wood encased vibrator. The label plates all say “Made in Japan” and give a manufacturer in the form of a trade mark symbol. I have been told the term “Made in Japan” would not have been used until 1922 and I don’t expect this model would have survived on the market into the depression so I date these from the 1920’s.  

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